Head Coach Robert Saleh 8.5

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Connor Hughes, SNY: We saw Mekhi (Becton) have a brace on his knee, which I don’t think was the case earlier. Is there a reason?

That’s a good question. Probably felt a little more comfortable today, give it a try and see if it creates a little more comfort for him. Like I said, the guy is grinding his butt off. The knee is stable. There’s obviously discomfort that he’s dealing with, but at the same time, he’s doing a really nice job grinding through it.

 

Zack Rosenblatt, The Athletic: It seemed like George (Fant) got most of the reps today. How do you think he’s done working his way back?

He’s done a really good job. He’s a professional. He’s doing everything he needs to do. Again, he’s got to continue to build that callous to deal with an in-season schedule, but he’s progressing in that direction.

 

Al Iannazzone, Newsday: Are you seeing Carl (Lawson) get stronger too?

That first d-line, it’s a pretty cool group. Carl’s pretty darn good, obviously. Again, his issue is not going to be whether or not he’s ready, it’s just when, right? He’s approaching that. He’s just a pro. Like I said, he’s been ready to roll since OTAs, but we’ve been more holding him back than the other way around.

 

Rich Cimini, ESPN: If your front four generates the type of pressure you hope for in the regular season season, how does that affect your approach?

The best way to play defense is with a four-man pass rush. The Giants vs. (Tom) Brady proved it. If you can just drop seven guys in coverage and have four guys feel like it’s a constant pressure, that’s the best way to play defense and most consistent way to play defense. Will it change much? Every game is independent in and of itself and depending on how the d-line is playing and the amount of pressure we’re getting, we’ll dictate accordingly.

 

Corey Annan, NJ Advanced Media: What have you seen from Braxton Berrios so far?

Same thing we saw last year. He’s a bulldog. He works his absolute tail off. He knows all spots on the offense. He can help people get lined up. He’s very versatile. He’s sure handed in the return game. Just love everything about him and the way he goes about his business. I’m just thankful that he’s here.

 

Connor Hughes, SNY: You mentioned the Giants vs. Brady, do you remember where you were during that game?

That’s a good question. I don’t even remember what year it was. I just remember it happening. So, ‘07? I think I was at Central Michigan. I was still trying to figure out how to tie my shoes at that point.

 

Al Iannazzone, Newsday: Have you seen anything from Jeremy Ruckert today?

We’ll see the tape, just glad that he’s getting reps and the stuff we’ve been feeling with regards to his rehab and the breakthrough that I talked about the other day has got him to the practice field pretty quick. We’re excited that he’s out there, but he has a long way to catch up. He’s missed all of OTAs, he’s a rookie, he’s missed half of training camp. So, he has a very long way to go to get to the point where his head is not spinning. Then from there, we can make a fair evaluation.

 

Brian Costello, New York Post: How do you feel about Denzel’s (Mims) start to camp?

With what I talked about earlier, he’s doing a really good job. He is fighting his tail off in the run game. Because he is so well conditioned right now, he is doing things with his body in the pass game from a route running standpoint that he hasn’t been able to do in the past. He’s battling in teams. That’s going to be a big part of it, too – being reliable on special teams. But, I’m really, really happy with the approach he’s taken this offseason, the way he attacked OTAs, the way he’s come into training camp, where he is mentally, the coaching that he is accepting, doesn’t make excuses. He’s grinding. He’s approaching it like a professional and for that I’m grateful.

 

Brian Costello, New York Post: (Follow Up) Has Mims come a long way from this time last year?

A long way. A long way. I’ll even tell him; he’s still got more left in the tank. He’s much improved from a year ago.

 

Connor Hughes, SNY: Is the green and white scrimmage kind of like a measuring stick for the staff as far as offense vs. defense?

You have the coordinators calling plays, so there’s that competitive deal going on between the coordinators, the players. Obviously, they want to move the ball in those moments, so it’s always competitive even though it’s more move the ball, the play count is going to be the same and on schedule with what we have planned. So, today was in the 48-play range. The Green and White will be in the 60-play range. But, instead of having third down and all the different periods we have, we’re going to be more ‘move the ball.’ Any time you move the ball, it gets very competitive. It gets very chirpy. Trying to get those guys to settle down after we brought the team in after practice – they’re competitive. They’re just jawing at one another. So, it always brings out the juice

 

Connor Hughes, SNY: (Follow Up) I just meant in terms of like a measuring stick.

I think when we start playing other teams. They’re so used to one another. Obviously, it’s all a part of the evaluation and we will take it all in. They’ve seen each other now since OTAs. When we get to go to Philadelphia, Atlanta will be here, go to the Giants. Those are our moments where we will be able to see a lot with regards to our player.

 

Al Iannazzone, Newsday: The run game is so important to this system. What do you think of that room and how do you think Michael (Carter) and Breece (Hall) compliment each other?

The o-line, the whole thing is complimentary. Receivers, people don’t realize that the offense plays a lot of condensed formations because the receivers have to be in there too. Just overall, our run game it doesn’t matter, especially when it gets cold in this area. You have to be able to run the football, especially when you’re trying to play playoff football, you’re trying to take those next steps. You have to be able to pound it. You have to be able to run it in the red zone. You have to be able to run it in short yard situations. You have to be able to have success running the football in this league, even though it’s turned into a passing league. Our o-line, our backs, receivers, we have a chance to be pretty cool with regards to that. Last year, I thought we were pretty darn good in the run game, especially late. I feel like it’s got a chance to be good again.

 

Al Iannazzone, Newsday: (Follow Up) Does it help having those young guys?

Oh, yeah. We just saw Zonovan (Knight) break one there, just gets up on the safety and off he goes. He’s having a nice camp. The versatility in that room is really good because Michael obviously has great versatility. Breece is a three down player. Tevin (Coleman) has an explosive running style. Ty Johnson has three-down ability, and then you add Zonovan. It’s a really, really cool group of players. And (La’Mical) Perine, just his big body and his ability to break through tackles and to push piles. It’s a fun group. It’s a versatile group, and one that I’m excited to see develop.

 

Rich Cimini, ESPN: Where does Perine fit into that? It almost seems like he’s the forgotten guy.

No, I don’t think he’s forgotten because he’s also showed up. He’s in really good shape. He looks really good. He’s come a long way, too. He’s a bruiser. If I was going to talk to you about Perine, he’s a bruiser. He understands the playbook a hell of a lot more. He’s doing a better job at protection which was a big part of it a year ago. When his pads are laying forward and he’s moving, he’s very hard to bring down. That group is in a very, very, very competitive state with regards that all of them bring something to the table.

 

Eric Allen, nyjets.com: What would you say about (Breece) Hall’s development?

He’s a very smart young man. So, he is picking up the protection system really well. He’s a big body. So, I don’t want to say a unicorn in that sense. He just has this very subtly slipperiness to him in the run game. He has good hands in the pass game, and he can block. He’s a good all-around back. It’s just a matter of continuing to develop and find his niche in this league.

 

Ryan Dunleavy, New York Post: Is this the point in camp where guys start chirping at each other?

One rule: No punching. They’re going to push. They’re going to shove. It’s going to happen. They’re sick of each other. They’re, ‘I’m sick of hearing the same calls from the coordinators.’ I think everyone is sick of each other at this point in camp, but we have one more week of it before we get to go to Philadelphia and see different humans. Rule one: Protect the team, don’t punch. That’s a 15-yard penalty and you get ejected from the game. So, even with all the skirmishes, I didn’t see a punch. So, at least we’re doing that right.

 

Connor Hughes, SNY: Are you sick of us, Robert?

Never. I love your faces. You’re so handsome.

 

Ryan Dunleavy, New York Post: What does Justin Hardee do for you guys?

Oh man, he’s a really cool person. Outside of football, he’s a tremendous family man, great heart. He is the epitome of all gas in the way he plays and strains. The words that come out of his mouth, we just love having him around. Any young man who comes into this league and is trying to find their path, look no further than him. The way he approaches everyday – an undrafted guy. He came in as a receiver, moves to corner, finds his way on special teams. He is the ones you cheer for because he does it the right way.

Connor Hughes, SNY: We saw Mekhi (Becton) have a brace on his knee, which I don’t think was the case earlier. Is there a reason?

That’s a good question. Probably felt a little more comfortable today, give it a try and see if it creates a little more comfort for him. Like I said, the guy is grinding his butt off. The knee is stable. There’s obviously discomfort that he’s dealing with, but at the same time, he’s doing a really nice job grinding through it.

 

Zack Rosenblatt, The Athletic: It seemed like George (Fant) got most of the reps today. How do you think he’s done working his way back?

He’s done a really good job. He’s a professional. He’s doing everything he needs to do. Again, he’s got to continue to build that callous to deal with an in-season schedule, but he’s progressing in that direction.

 

Al Iannazzone, Newsday: Are you seeing Carl (Lawson) get stronger too?

That first d-line, it’s a pretty cool group. Carl’s pretty darn good, obviously. Again, his issue is not going to be whether or not he’s ready, it’s just when, right? He’s approaching that. He’s just a pro. Like I said, he’s been ready to roll since OTAs, but we’ve been more holding him back than the other way around.

 

Rich Cimini, ESPN: If your front four generates the type of pressure you hope for in the regular season season, how does that affect your approach?

The best way to play defense is with a four-man pass rush. The Giants vs. (Tom) Brady proved it. If you can just drop seven guys in coverage and have four guys feel like it’s a constant pressure, that’s the best way to play defense and most consistent way to play defense. Will it change much? Every game is independent in and of itself and depending on how the d-line is playing and the amount of pressure we’re getting, we’ll dictate accordingly.

 

Corey Annan, NJ Advanced Media: What have you seen from Braxton Berrios so far?

Same thing we saw last year. He’s a bulldog. He works his absolute tail off. He knows all spots on the offense. He can help people get lined up. He’s very versatile. He’s sure handed in the return game. Just love everything about him and the way he goes about his business. I’m just thankful that he’s here.

 

Connor Hughes, SNY: You mentioned the Giants vs. Brady, do you remember where you were during that game?

That’s a good question. I don’t even remember what year it was. I just remember it happening. So, ‘07? I think I was at Central Michigan. I was still trying to figure out how to tie my shoes at that point.

 

Al Iannazzone, Newsday: Have you seen anything from Jeremy Ruckert today?

We’ll see the tape, just glad that he’s getting reps and the stuff we’ve been feeling with regards to his rehab and the breakthrough that I talked about the other day has got him to the practice field pretty quick. We’re excited that he’s out there, but he has a long way to catch up. He’s missed all of OTAs, he’s a rookie, he’s missed half of training camp. So, he has a very long way to go to get to the point where his head is not spinning. Then from there, we can make a fair evaluation.

 

Brian Costello, New York Post: How do you feel about Denzel’s (Mims) start to camp?

With what I talked about earlier, he’s doing a really good job. He is fighting his tail off in the run game. Because he is so well conditioned right now, he is doing things with his body in the pass game from a route running standpoint that he hasn’t been able to do in the past. He’s battling in teams. That’s going to be a big part of it, too – being reliable on special teams. But, I’m really, really happy with the approach he’s taken this offseason, the way he attacked OTAs, the way he’s come into training camp, where he is mentally, the coaching that he is accepting, doesn’t make excuses. He’s grinding. He’s approaching it like a professional and for that I’m grateful.

 

Brian Costello, New York Post: (Follow Up) Has Mims come a long way from this time last year?

A long way. A long way. I’ll even tell him; he’s still got more left in the tank. He’s much improved from a year ago.

 

Connor Hughes, SNY: Is the green and white scrimmage kind of like a measuring stick for the staff as far as offense vs. defense?

You have the coordinators calling plays, so there’s that competitive deal going on between the coordinators, the players. Obviously, they want to move the ball in those moments, so it’s always competitive even though it’s more move the ball, the play count is going to be the same and on schedule with what we have planned. So, today was in the 48-play range. The Green and White will be in the 60-play range. But, instead of having third down and all the different periods we have, we’re going to be more ‘move the ball.’ Any time you move the ball, it gets very competitive. It gets very chirpy. Trying to get those guys to settle down after we brought the team in after practice – they’re competitive. They’re just jawing at one another. So, it always brings out the juice

 

Connor Hughes, SNY: (Follow Up) I just meant in terms of like a measuring stick.

I think when we start playing other teams. They’re so used to one another. Obviously, it’s all a part of the evaluation and we will take it all in. They’ve seen each other now since OTAs. When we get to go to Philadelphia, Atlanta will be here, go to the Giants. Those are our moments where we will be able to see a lot with regards to our player.

 

Al Iannazzone, Newsday: The run game is so important to this system. What do you think of that room and how do you think Michael (Carter) and Breece (Hall) compliment each other?

The o-line, the whole thing is complimentary. Receivers, people don’t realize that the offense plays a lot of condensed formations because the receivers have to be in there too. Just overall, our run game it doesn’t matter, especially when it gets cold in this area. You have to be able to run the football, especially when you’re trying to play playoff football, you’re trying to take those next steps. You have to be able to pound it. You have to be able to run it in the red zone. You have to be able to run it in short yard situations. You have to be able to have success running the football in this league, even though it’s turned into a passing league. Our o-line, our backs, receivers, we have a chance to be pretty cool with regards to that. Last year, I thought we were pretty darn good in the run game, especially late. I feel like it’s got a chance to be good again.

 

Al Iannazzone, Newsday: (Follow Up) Does it help having those young guys?

Oh, yeah. We just saw Zonovan (Knight) break one there, just gets up on the safety and off he goes. He’s having a nice camp. The versatility in that room is really good because Michael obviously has great versatility. Breece is a three down player. Tevin (Coleman) has an explosive running style. Ty Johnson has three-down ability, and then you add Zonovan. It’s a really, really cool group of players. And (La’Mical) Perine, just his big body and his ability to break through tackles and to push piles. It’s a fun group. It’s a versatile group, and one that I’m excited to see develop.

 

Rich Cimini, ESPN: Where does Perine fit into that? It almost seems like he’s the forgotten guy.

No, I don’t think he’s forgotten because he’s also showed up. He’s in really good shape. He looks really good. He’s come a long way, too. He’s a bruiser. If I was going to talk to you about Perine, he’s a bruiser. He understands the playbook a hell of a lot more. He’s doing a better job at protection which was a big part of it a year ago. When his pads are laying forward and he’s moving, he’s very hard to bring down. That group is in a very, very, very competitive state with regards that all of them bring something to the table.

 

Eric Allen, nyjets.com: What would you say about (Breece) Hall’s development?

He’s a very smart young man. So, he is picking up the protection system really well. He’s a big body. So, I don’t want to say a unicorn in that sense. He just has this very subtly slipperiness to him in the run game. He has good hands in the pass game, and he can block. He’s a good all-around back. It’s just a matter of continuing to develop and find his niche in this league.

 

Ryan Dunleavy, New York Post: Is this the point in camp where guys start chirping at each other?

One rule: No punching. They’re going to push. They’re going to shove. It’s going to happen. They’re sick of each other. They’re, ‘I’m sick of hearing the same calls from the coordinators.’ I think everyone is sick of each other at this point in camp, but we have one more week of it before we get to go to Philadelphia and see different humans. Rule one: Protect the team, don’t punch. That’s a 15-yard penalty and you get ejected from the game. So, even with all the skirmishes, I didn’t see a punch. So, at least we’re doing that right.

 

Connor Hughes, SNY: Are you sick of us, Robert?

Never. I love your faces. You’re so handsome.

 

Ryan Dunleavy, New York Post: What does Justin Hardee do for you guys?

Oh man, he’s a really cool person. Outside of football, he’s a tremendous family man, great heart. He is the epitome of all gas in the way he plays and strains. The words that come out of his mouth, we just love having him around. Any young man who comes into this league and is trying to find their path, look no further than him. The way he approaches everyday – an undrafted guy. He came in as a receiver, moves to corner, finds his way on special teams. He is the ones you cheer for because he does it the right way.

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